Why Would Amazon Want to Sell a Mobile Phone?

Posted June 16th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

If you believe the rumors, Amazon.com is going to enter the mobile phone business this week, with most pundits guessing that a mysterious video suggest that it will release a phone with novel 3-D viewing capabilities.

There are obvious reasons for Amazon to be eying the category. The mobile phone industry is massive, with close to 2 billion devices shipped annually and total spending on wireless-related services of more than $1.6 trillion across the world. As mobile devices increasingly serve as the center of the consumer’s world, their importance to a range of companies is increasing.

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Why Would Amazon Want to Sell a Mobile Phone?

Posted June 16th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

If you believe the rumors, Amazon.com is going to enter the mobile phone business this week, with most pundits guessing that a mysterious video suggest that it will release a phone with novel 3-D viewing capabilities.

There are obvious reasons for Amazon to be eying the category. The mobile phone industry is massive, with close to 2 billion devices shipped annually and total spending on wireless-related services of more than $1.6 trillion across the world. As mobile devices increasingly serve as the center of the consumer’s world, their importance to a range of companies is increasing.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Innovation Is Immediately Profitable

Posted June 13th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

The meeting was going swimmingly.  The team had spent the past two months formulating what it thought was a high-potential disruptive idea. Now it was asking the business unit’s top brass to invest a relatively modest sum to begin to commercialize the concept.

Team members had researched the market thoroughly. They had made a compelling case:  The idea addressed an important need that customers cared about. It used a unique asset that gave the company a leg up over competitors. It employed a business model that would make it very difficult for the current market leader to respond. The classic fingerprint of disruptive success.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Innovation Is Immediately Profitable

Posted June 13th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

The meeting was going swimmingly.  The team had spent the past two months formulating what it thought was a high-potential disruptive idea. Now it was asking the business unit’s top brass to invest a relatively modest sum to begin to commercialize the concept.

Team members had researched the market thoroughly. They had made a compelling case:  The idea addressed an important need that customers cared about. It used a unique asset that gave the company a leg up over competitors. It employed a business model that would make it very difficult for the current market leader to respond. The classic fingerprint of disruptive success.

Read the rest of this entry »

No Innovation Is Immediately Profitable

Posted June 13th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

The meeting was going swimmingly.  The team had spent the past two months formulating what it thought was a high-potential disruptive idea. Now it was asking the business unit’s top brass to invest a relatively modest sum to begin to commercialize the concept.

Team members had researched the market thoroughly. They had made a compelling case:  The idea addressed an important need that customers cared about. It used a unique asset that gave the company a leg up over competitors. It employed a business model that would make it very difficult for the current market leader to respond. The classic fingerprint of disruptive success.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Industries Apple Could Disrupt Next

Posted June 4th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

After an unprecedented decade of growth, analysts wrote off 2013 as a year to forget for Apple. Most pundits agreed on what was wrong — a lack of breakthrough innovation since the passing of founder Steve Jobs. But in our view, Apple faces a deeper problem: the industries most susceptible to its unique disruptive formula are just too small to meet its growth needs.

Apple has seemingly served as an anomaly to the theory of disruptive innovation. After all, it grew from $7 billion in 2003 to $171 billion in 2013 by entering established (albeit still-emerging) markets with superior products — something the model suggests is a losing strategy.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Industries Apple Could Disrupt Next

Posted June 4th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

After an unprecedented decade of growth, analysts wrote off 2013 as a year to forget for Apple. Most pundits agreed on what was wrong — a lack of breakthrough innovation since the passing of founder Steve Jobs. But in our view, Apple faces a deeper problem: the industries most susceptible to its unique disruptive formula are just too small to meet its growth needs.

Apple has seemingly served as an anomaly to the theory of disruptive innovation. After all, it grew from $7 billion in 2003 to $171 billion in 2013 by entering established (albeit still-emerging) markets with superior products — something the model suggests is a losing strategy.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Industries Apple Could Disrupt Next

Posted June 4th, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

After an unprecedented decade of growth, analysts wrote off 2013 as a year to forget for Apple. Most pundits agreed on what was wrong — a lack of breakthrough innovation since the passing of founder Steve Jobs. But in our view, Apple faces a deeper problem: the industries most susceptible to its unique disruptive formula are just too small to meet its growth needs.

Apple has seemingly served as an anomaly to the theory of disruptive innovation. After all, it grew from $7 billion in 2003 to $171 billion in 2013 by entering established (albeit still-emerging) markets with superior products — something the model suggests is a losing strategy.

Read the rest of this entry »

What’s Holding Uber Back

Posted June 2nd, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

As a consumer, I absolutely love Uber. The other week I was at a dinner in a relatively remote part of Singapore. Afterwards, the hotel concierge furiously worked three phones to get taxi cabs to appear for the 15 people who were waiting with growing impatience. I clicked three buttons, and my ride was there in 12 minutes. It’s simple, and it works beautifully.

I also love Uber as a student (and teacher) of disruptive innovation theory, because the challenges the transportation company is encountering as it seeks to expand into new cities helpfully illustrate how to assess an idea’s disruptive potential.

Read the rest of this entry »

What’s Holding Uber Back

Posted June 2nd, 2014 by Scott Anthony in Innovation Insights

As a consumer, I absolutely love Uber. The other week I was at a dinner in a relatively remote part of Singapore. Afterwards, the hotel concierge furiously worked three phones to get taxi cabs to appear for the 15 people who were waiting with growing impatience. I clicked three buttons, and my ride was there in 12 minutes. It’s simple, and it works beautifully.

I also love Uber as a student (and teacher) of disruptive innovation theory, because the challenges the transportation company is encountering as it seeks to expand into new cities helpfully illustrate how to assess an idea’s disruptive potential.

Read the rest of this entry »